Moengo Festival of Visual Art
  • PURCY TJIN

    Certain elements make the work of Tjin truly authentic and recognizable. The colours are usually dark, often surrounded by black lines, while full lips and Asian eyes characterize the faces. His themes have a similar recognisability. His paintings are always expressions of desire, of intense sensuality, and sometimes of raw lust and pleasure.“Our existence is all about desire”, he states in an interview with a local newspaper. The closed eyes and the open mouths leave no doubt about those passionate desires.

  • KEN DOORSON

    He is a painter, a sculptor and an installation artist. But Ken Doorson has become especially popular due to his powerful, oversized portraits of black men. Being confronted therewith is a penetrating experience for the beholder. Not only because of their extraordinary size, but also through the intense, unusual and sometimes even wild colors and color combinations which Doorson uses. Looking at them is at the same time almost an intimate occurrence, because the eyes of the person portrayed are often closed or averted.

  • SHAUNDELL HORTON

    In 2011 Shaundell Horton graduated from the Nola Hatterman Art Academy in Suriname. A young promising artist who wants the bond that she shares with her country of birth, and with Suriname, to shine through in her work. In 2012 she has her first solo exhibition - ‘Ties’ - in Fort Zeelandia. Many of the works that she exhibits are somewhere between abstract and figurative. In the painting from which the title is derived, she makes her connection with her country of birth visible by incorporating a Guyanese banknote.

  • TERRY RATHJE

    Terry Rathje works as an artist, designer and graphic designer on the boundaries of sculpture, assemblage and spatial installations. In his sculptural work Rathje connects the mathematical beauty of geometry with the peculiarities of nature. Nature is portrayed in the octagonal star ’Stella Octangula’, the organic shell ’Armorpod’ and the circle stacking ’Rise Above’. These works consist of raw and processed materials and ‘found typography’. The latter stands for assemblages of text-based designs. Old letters form new sentences inspired by poetry and graphical design.